Death of Archimedes
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Illustrations



A mosaic originally believed to date from ancient times, but now thought to be an 18th century copy or falsification. The central portion shown here is 35 by 27 centimeters and is surrounded by an 8-centimeter border. Located in the Städtische Galerie Liebieghaus, Frankfurt am Main, Germany.

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  Medium Size: 201 kilobytes, 640 x 480 pixels
  Large Size: Black background, 2588 kilobytes, 2865 x 2189 pixels
  Large Size: White background, 2585 kilobytes, 2865 x 2189 pixels


A brown and black charcoal (42.6 x 38.9 centimeters, on three sheets pasted together, c. 1848-50) by the French artist Honoré Daumier (1808-79). Located in the Szépmüvészeti Museum of Fine Arts, Budapest, Hungary.

References: [1] The Drawings of Daumier and Millet by Bruce Laughton, Yale University Press, New Haven & London, 1991 (page 51). [2] Honoré Daumier by Bruce Laughton, Yale University Press, New Haven & London, 1996 (page 27).

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  Large Size: 182 kilobytes, 858 x 960 pixels


An oil painting (42.5 x 60.5 centimeters) by the Italian artist Sebastiano Ricci (1659-1734) entitled “The Refusal of Archimedes”. It shows Archimedes refusing to accompany a Roman soldier, who thereupon slew him. The painting is located in the Hannover State Museum, Hannover, Germany.

Enlarged image from the Zeno digital library of Germany:
  288 kilobytes
  1000 x 724 pixels


A fresco entitled “Archimède tué par le soldat” (“Archimedes killed by the soldier”) by the French artist Eugène Delacroix (1798-1863), painted during 1838-47. It appears on one of five cupolas in the library of the Palais Bourbon in Paris.

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  Medium Size: 51 kilobytes, 462 x 381 pixels
  Larger View: 234 kilobytes, 614 x 782 pixels
  Download from Palais Bourbon site: 112 kilobytes, 640 x 426 pixels


An illustration from a poster for a meeting celebrating Archimedes held in Syracuse, Sicily, on April 11-16, 1961. It is based on a painting by the Italian artist Niccolò Barabino (1832-1891), now located in the Modern Art Gallery of the Revoltella Museum in Trieste, Italy.

Enlarged image:
  59 kilobytes
  328 x 480 pixels


An oil painting (117 x 235 centimeters) by the Italian artist Giovan Battista Langetti (1635-1676) entitled “Archimedes with Allegorical Figures of War and Peace”, now part of a private collection.

Enlarged image:
   Medium Size: 506 x 380 pixels, 60 kilobytes
   Large Size: 1800 x 1352 pixels, 928 kilobytes


An engraving from an 18th-century Italian book by Giovanni Maria Mazzuchelli (1707-65) entitled Notizie Isotoriche e Critiche Intorno alla Vita, alle Invenzioni, ed agli Scritti di Archimede Siracusano.

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   Medium Size: 640 x 450 pixels, 110 kilobytes
   Large Size: 1213 x 645 pixels, 207 kilobytes


An engraving after a painting by the French painter Gustave Courtois (1853-1923).

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   600 dpi, 4652 x 3840 pixels, 256 grayscales, 5849 kilobytes
   300 dpi, 2326 x 1920 pixels, 256 grayscales, 2477 kilobytes
   150 dpi, 1163 x   960 pixels, 256 grayscales, 603 kilobytes
   75 dpi, 582 x   480 pixels, 256 grayscales, 134 kilobytes


A book illustration from an unknown source.

Enlarged image:
256 grayscales
34 kilobytes
397 x 480 pixels


An engraving from an 1882 book entitled A Pictorial History of the World’s Great Nations from the Earliest Dates to the Present Time, Vol. I (page 256) by Charlotte Mary Yonge. A caption reads “The Last Hour of Archimedes”.

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  Medium size: 111 kilobytes, 564 x 480 pixels, 256 grayscales
  Large size: 2086 kilobytes, 3049 x 2593 pixels, 256 grayscales


An illustration from the page of an unidentified book in the files of the Print and Picture Collection of the Free Library of Philadelphia. A caption reads “Tod des Archimedes”.

Enlarged image:
256 grayscales
67 kilobytes
640 x 471 pixels


An engraving by Morace after a painting by P. F. Mola. From a plate of a series entitled “Galerie du Palais-Royal” published in Paris in 1786 by J. Couche and J. Bouillard.

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  Medium size: 47 kilobytes, 373 x 480 pixels, 256 grayscales
  Large size: 1897 kilobytes, 1789 x 2331 pixels, 256 grayscales


Painting by the Italian artist Pier Francesco Mola (1612-1666) entitled “La mort d'Archimède” (dated 1660, 122 x 135 centimeters). The thumbnail view is from an auction catalog of the Babuino Auction House (Rome, Italy), which sold the painting in May 2003.

An illustration from the Beacon Lights of History book series authored by John Lord (1810-1894). A caption reads, “The Death of Archimedes. After the painting by E. Vimont.” Edouard Vimont was a French artist (1846-1930). Notice the armillary sphere the soldier has his left hand on, the Archimedes screw in the upper righthand corner, and the diagram behind the chair of the sphere with the circumscribed cylinder that was placed on Archimedes' tomb.

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  Medium size: 53 kilobytes, 634 x 480 pixels, 256 grayscales
  Large size: 311 kilobytes, 1360 x 1011 pixels, 256 grayscales


Woodcut from a 1568 edition of Livy's History of Rome from its Foundation published by Wingandus Gallus in Frankfurt, Germany. The illustration is by Jost Ammon (1539-1591). Scanned from a copy owned by the Washington State University Library (Pullman, Washington, USA).

Enlarged images:
  Medium size: 176 kilobytes, 640 x 468 pixels, 256 grayscales
  Large size: 338 kilobytes, 914 x 1668 pixels, 256 grayscales


A modern illustration of the death of Archimedes on a piece of papyrus from the Centro del Papiro in Syracuse, Sicily. Syracuse was a major supplier of papyrus in ancient times. A caption reads “L'uccisione di Archimede”.

Enlarged image:
156 kilobytes
863 x 1113 pixels


"The Lunatic at Syracuse"

István Farkas (Hungarian 1887-1944)
1930, tempera on wood, 80 x 99 cm
Hungarian National Gallery (Budapest, Hungary)

This painting “protests against the assassination of Archimedes . . . and dangers threatening 20th century man.” An enlarged view (872 x 690 pixels, 100 kilobytes), together with an interpretation, is available at a site dedicated to the fine arts in Hungary.